Tuesday, September 1, 2015

2nd video emerges of deadly shooting by deputies

By SETH ROBBINS and DAVID WARREN


SAN ANTONIO (AP) — A second video has emerged that gives authorities a "very clear view" of a confrontation between deputies and a Texas man who had his hands raised before he was shot and killed, a prosecutor said Tuesday.


Bexar County District Attorney Nico LaHood described the new video and one broadcast earlier as "disturbing," but cautioned against a rush to judgment as authorities investigate the shooting that killed 41-year-old Gilbert Flores northwest of San Antonio.


An initial video recorded by a motorist from some distance was posted online by a San Antonio TV station. It shows Flores outside a residence Friday facing two deputies when he raises his hands — one arm obscured by a utility pole. The deputies fired multiple times.


Sheriff's officials say Flores was armed, though didn't specify with what, and that nonlethal efforts to subdue him, including a Taser, were unsuccessful.
LaHood declined to say Tuesday whether Flores' arm motion was surrender.


"I don't know what his intent was," he said. "All I can tell you is the video is disturbing. But my encouragement to everyone is to press the pause button."


Related article: Can you pass the written police officer exam?

San Antonio attorney Thomas J. Henry, who is representing the family, said in an interview Tuesday that the initial video appears to show that deadly force was unnecessary but he is seeking more evidence.


"From a lay perspective, seeing the video, it does appear the immediate danger is gone because he had both hands in the air," Henry said. "Now there are other videos and other pieces of evidence that we want to gather." He said the family is considering filing a lawsuit to compel authorities to turn over more evidence.



Flores' death is the country's latest law enforcement shooting to draw heavy scrutiny for using deadly force in a situation where it may not have been necessary. Law enforcement officials in the U.S. have expressed concern that the deadly confrontations have spawned retaliatory shootings of officers, including last week's death of a suburban Houston deputy at a gas station.


The second video was recorded by a witness closer to the incident, LaHood said, but he declined to provide further information about what it reveals or when authorities acquired it. An investigation is underway to determine whether the deputies will face criminal charges or whether the danger to them was imminent, LaHood said.


Deputies Greg Vasquez and Robert Sanchez, who were not equipped with body cameras at the time of the encounter, have been placed on administrative leave. Sanchez has worked more than 20 years with the sheriff's office and Vasquez has been with the agency more than 10 years, according to records with the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement. Both had received training in use of force and nonlethal devices.


Michelle Lee, a special agent for the FBI in San Antonio, confirmed Tuesday that "experienced civil rights investigators" are monitoring the investigation.


Related article: DIED in CUSTODY: Man jailed since April for alleged $5 theft found dead in cell



The deputies had responded to a domestic disturbance, authorities have said, and found a woman at the residence with a cut on her head and a baby who appeared to be injured. Sheriff's officials have not indicated whether they believe Flores harmed the two.


Attempts to contact members of Flores' family were unsuccessful Tuesday, but Henry said that Flores' wife is devastated. The couple have a child who is just 21 days old, he said.


Bexar County court records show Flores was convicted in 2003 of aggravated robbery, and the San Antonio Express-News reports he also has a conviction for assault with a deadly weapon.


U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, who represents part of the San Antonio area, said in a statement that Friday's shooting was "extremely disturbing."


"This incident is further evidence that police officers and deputies should wear body cameras," he said. "The widely supported technology brings transparency and accountability that protects law enforcement and civilians alike."


Bexar County commissioners approved a county budget Tuesday that includes more than $630,000 to provide deputies with body cameras and also cameras for patrol vehicles.






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Enhanced Interrogation or Human Experimentation?

By



Editors note: While we applaud the MSM for finally running this story, we'd like to point out that Underground News ran the same story in April 2014- Physicians for Human Rights Report: Doctors had ‘central role’ in CIA abuse and human experimentation (We also published this same article in 2012 on WP)


The Central Intelligence Agency’s use of so-called “enhanced interrogation techniques” on detainees in the aftermath of 9/11 violated its own guidelines around medical ethics and “human experimentation,” according to a new report in the Guardian.



Previously classified documents obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union and published by the Guardian say the agency “shall not sponsor, contract for, or conduct research on human subjects,” except in accordance with guidelines issued by the Department of Health and Human Services.



The documents also reveal that the CIA’s director has the power to “approve, modify, or disapprove all proposals pertaining to human subject research.” As the Guardian report notes: 
The leeway provides the director, who has never in the agency’s history been a medical doctor, with significant influence over limitations the U.S. government sets to preserve safe, humane and ethical procedures on people.
 
CIA director George Tenet approved abusive interrogation techniques, including waterboarding, designed by CIA contractor psychologists. He further instructed the agency’s health personnel to oversee the brutal interrogations – the beginning of years of controversy, still ongoing, about U.S. torture as a violation of medical ethics.
In 2013, a Columbia University task force found that medical professionals working for the CIA “played a critical role in reviewing and approving forms of torture, including waterboarding, as well as in advising the Department of Justice that ‘enhanced interrogation’ methods, such as extended sleep deprivation and waterboarding that are recognized as forms of torture, were medically acceptable.”



A report published in April also alleged that the American Psychological Association secretly collaborated with the Bush administration, the CIA and the Department of Defense to shore up the legal and ethical justification for the program, according to The New York Times.



Since they were revealed, the CIA’s methods have been widely criticized and labeled as torture, with even President Bush admitting in August, “We tortured some folks.” In December, a scathing review by the Senate Intelligence Committee concluded that the CIA’s interrogation program was brutal, mismanaged and also did not produce intelligence that couldn’t have been obtained otherwise.



Although a 2009 executive order signed by Obama ended the use of torture by the government, lawmakers including Senators John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) want to enshrine the ban in law. Last week, they sponsored an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act that would formally outlaw the use of torture by any government agency.

Related Film: Secrets, Politics and Torture:



Even though Abu Ghraib itself wasn’t a CIA-run facility, the agency was worried about the scandal’s ramifications.



That’s because the CIA was in possession of something that was potentially more explosive than the detainee abuse photos: hundreds of hours of videotaped “enhanced interrogations” of two Al Qaeda suspects in CIA detention, that included the use of techniques widely described as torture.



Their destruction was ordered by Jose Rodriguez, then the CIA’s top operations officer.



“I was told, if those videotapes had ever been seen, the reaction around the world would not have been survivable,” Jane Mayer of The New Yorker.



Investigators would eventually determine that one of the suspects in the tapes, Abu Zubaydah, “was not a senior member” of Al Qaeda. The second man in the tapes, Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, “did not provide any additional threat information during, or after these interrogations.”



Rodriguez was never prosecuted. In 2006, President George W. Bush signed legislation granting immunity to anyone at the CIA who had worked on the program.



In July 2002, Attorney General John Ashcroft verbally approved the use of 11 so-called “EITs”: attention grasp, walling, the facial hold, the facial slap, cramped confinement, wall standing, stress positions, sleep deprivation, the use of diapers, use of insects, and waterboarding. Later other techniques, such as water dousing, were added.



CIA interrogators didn’t always stick to the approved techniques, though. During waterboarding on March 12, 2003, a CIA medical officer said that "we are basically doing a series of near drowning's."



CIA Interrogation techniques:



Hawsawi was subjected to unapproved water dousing in a way that was “indistinguishable” from water boarding. He was also one of two detainees given a rectal exam with "excessive force."



Before being subjected to the CIA's "enhanced interrogation techniques," Hambali was cooperative. Afterward, he admittedly fabricated information.



CIA interrogators pureed the contents of his lunch tray, which included hummus, pasta with sauce, nuts and raisins, and fed it into Khan’s rectum.

Despite assertions from the CIA and the Bush administration that only three detainees were waterboarded, Al-Shara'iya said that he, too, had been subjected to the procedure numerous times.



Turki was a former CIA informant, mistakenly captured and subjected to "enhanced interrogation techniques" by the agency he had once worked for.

Rahman died after fewer than 20 days in CIA custody.



How can anyone not define this sick stuff as torture? It's the kind of stuff you'd expect if captured by a psychopath. It's utterly shameful and contributes nothing.


The report found that the ethical guidelines "prioritized the protection of psychologists -- even those who might have engaged in unethical behavior -- above the protection of the public."


The review also found that two former APA presidents sat on CIA advisory committees, and one of them told the intelligence agency he did not think that sleep deprivation constituted torture.




Interrogators used a range of techniques on suspected Al Qaeda members, including physical threats, mock executions, choking to the point where detainees lost consciousness and even using a stiff brush to scrub a detainee’s skin raw.

Such spy agency techniques — and monitoring by doctors to gauge their effectiveness — “approaches unlawful experimentation” on human subjects.



Sources:

solitarywatch.com

http://www.law.unc.edu/documents/academics/humanrights/solitaryconfinement/fullreport.pdf



 

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Welcome to the movement. Welcome to action... 

Happy Independence day

How to make money in the underground economy

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(How to) Rob a bank and get away

Pig tactics and how to beat them

How to file a complaint against a police officer

Leak college textbook PDF files

Myth Busters: Why is Marijuana Illegal?

(How to) Grow and manufacture drugs

How to beat Stingray, NSA, FBI, and police surveillance

The Domestic Drone threat

(How to) Avoid Backpage Prostitution Stings (for Dummies)

Sites other than MyRedbooks/Craigslist/Backpage:

(We all know) Prostitution should be legal

Escorts: A Historical look

(How to) Donates cellphones to prison inmates

Torture American style

The Crisis of Juvenile Prison Rape:

CPS Protection at its worse

How to beat CPS (Protect your kids from CPS)

Beat your court case

Beat police and DEA drug stings

Drug test the president

Beat any drug test FREE

(How to) Find out who's a Snitch (for Dummies)

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Not Talk to the Police

Drugs Are Better and Cheaper Than Ever

By Rebecca McCray, Jason Koebler, Christopher Rice

Heroin, cocaine, and marijuana are just as available, far cheaper, and more potent than they were at the start of the War on Drugs, according to a new study.

We've known for far too long that the War on Drugs has been a failure, but the statistics reported in the British Medical Journal by Evan Wood, of the University of British Columbia's Urban Health Research Initiative, are astounding. Wood and his team aggregated government drug surveillance data from seven different countries. Between 1990 and 2010, the street price, adjusting for inflation, of heroin, cocaine, and marijuana fell roughly 80 percent. At the same time, the street drugs became much more potent: The average purity of heroin increased by 60 percent, the purity of cocaine increased by 11 percent, and the potency of cannabis increased 161 percent. The story is much the same in Europe and Australia, with street prices dropping and supply remaining stable, despite a huge increase in drug seizures.

Though we've known that weed is stronger than ever, it seems like the trend has extended to other, harder drugs.

Related article: Prohibition and Drugs


New data shows drug policy isn’t doing what it’s meant to. The war on drugs drastically altered the face of the federal prison system, but it hasn’t made anyone safer or meaningfully decreased the availability of drugs. That’s just one of the findings of a new report from the Pew Research Center, which examines the drastic rise in the number of people being sent to prison for drug offenses in the 1980s and 1990s.



While in 1980 there were fewer than 5,000 people serving time in federal prison for drug-related offenses, today there are more than 95,000—and the data shows it’s not because we’ve gotten better at keeping drugs off the streets.


Violent crime rose 41 percent between 1983 and 1991, Pew found, and peaked at 758 violent offenses per 100,000 U.S. residents. Anecdotal evidence tied that heightened violence to the illegal drug trade, particularly crack cocaine, which encouraged legislators to make it clear to their constituents that they were tough on crime by ramping up sentences for drug offenders. The average prison sentence for a federal drug offender rose 36 percent between 1980 and 2011, tacking almost 20 additional months onto the average sentence.


But putting more drug offenders behind bars for longer periods of time hasn’t paid off, according to Pew. The street prices of illegal drugs such as cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine have actually gone down since 1980—even as their purity has increased. That indicates ample supply, and indeed, the Office of National Drug Control Policy says illicit drug use has increased. (The availability of drugs may be tied to the fact that high-level drug traffickers make up a small portion of all drug offenders in federal custody—just 11 percent, according to Pew.)


While violent and property crimes have decreased dramatically over the past three decades, research shows that high incarceration rates can’t be credited for that drop. Approximately 5 percent of the crime decline in the 1990s can be attributed to incarceration, while less than 1 percent of the decline between 2000 and 2013 can be linked to incarceration, according to the Brennan Center for Justice. As Pew notes, recidivism rates among federal drug offenders barely changed as more were locked up—another indication that the war on drugs didn’t deliver on its public safety promises.


Related article: Prohibition KILLS


Meanwhile, the long sentences have landed especially hard on street-level dealers, as well as drug mules and couriers, who made up nearly half of the people sentenced for federal drug crimes in 2009. These pawns in the drug trade typically come from low-income communities from which manufacturing jobs have fled for China and Mexico in the last couple of decades, and where recreational opportunities are few.


We've thrown hundreds of billions of dollars at this problem. The 'drug war' is an opportunity to increase and justify the over bloated budgets of agencies like the DEA, Customs, FBI, federal and local prosecutors, attorneys, bail bondsmen, judges, the Bureau of Prisons, drug testing companies, and drug counselors. The "Politics of Contraband" created job security for the above in America today. It is a shame and a sham and the taxpayers have carried the financial burden of this war. It is time to explore a different way to treat these problems without the extreme cost and the intrusive nature of our inalienable rights.


In Canada, we've experimented with heroin prescriptions for people who have failed methadone treatment. The outcomes have been incredibly positive.


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Welcome to the movement. Welcome to action... 

Happy Independence day

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(How to) Rob a bank and get away

Pig tactics and how to beat them

How to file a complaint against a police officer

Leak college textbook PDF files

Myth Busters: Why is Marijuana Illegal?

(How to) Grow and manufacture drugs

How to beat Stingray, NSA, FBI, and police surveillance

The Domestic Drone threat

(How to) Avoid Backpage Prostitution Stings (for Dummies)

Sites other than MyRedbooks/Craigslist/Backpage:

(We all know) Prostitution should be legal

Escorts: A Historical look

(How to) Donates cellphones to prison inmates

Torture American style

The Crisis of Juvenile Prison Rape:

CPS Protection at its worse

How to beat CPS (Protect your kids from CPS)

Beat your court case

Beat police and DEA drug stings

Drug test the president

Beat any drug test FREE

(How to) Find out who's a Snitch (for Dummies)

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Not Talk to the Police

10 Rules to the Game

(How to) Be a Man

(How to) Save water/lower your water bill

(How to) Start a vegetable garden

A Young Woman Goes 'Underground In Berlin' To Escape The Holocaust

A lot of books come across our desks here at Weekend Edition. One caught our eye recently, because of the unusual way it came to be published. The title sums up the story — Underground in Berlin: A Young Woman's Extraordinary Tale of Survival in the Heart of Nazi Germany.


That remarkable tale came to light thanks to a request by her son, historian Hermann Simon. "I once put a tape recorder and said to her, 'You always wanted to tell me the story of your life. Well, go ahead.' "


In one of the recordings her son made near the end of her life, Marie Jalowicz Simon describes a near miss with the Gestapo. It was June 22, 1942. Her father had just died after a long illness, leaving her, a 20-year-old Jewish woman, all alone in Berlin.


Marie Jalowicz watched as friends and family were hauled away to unknown destinations. When the Gestapo came for her, she was staying with a family friend. The officers ordered Marie to get ready to go.


Underground in Berlin

Underground in Berlin
A Young Woman's Extraordinary Tale of Survival in the Heart of Nazi Germany

"We want to ask you some questions. It won't take long, and you'll be back in a couple of hours," they said. "That was the kind of thing they always said to prevent people from falling into a fit of hysterics, or swallowing a poison capsule, or doing anything else that would have been inconvenient for the Gestapo."


With the help of her friend, Marie fled.


"She thought it is only possible for her to survive not in her former neighborhood. It must be a place that is for her completely for her unknown," Hermann Simon says.


So she wouldn't be recognized, Marie Jalowicz went underground, moving around the city to survive — staying with sympathetic Germans whom Simon describes as on the fringe of German society: "Prostitutes, poor people, really outsiders. Not the so-called normal people."


Some of them treated her decently. They chose to ignore the fact that Marie was a Jew and in exchange she helped them — standing in lines for rations or cooking and cleaning. Others exploited her. She recounts in matter-of-fact tone how time and again she had to endure sexual assaults. Her son describes it as part of the price she paid for survival.


And then, after Marie Jalowicz had spent three years living under an assumed name — surviving hunger and abuse and countless Allied air raids — the war ended and the Russians rolled into Berlin.


"She once said to me: it was difficult to go underground, but it was also difficult to come out from the underground," Simon says. "Everything changed. And she was alone. At the end, she was alone."


The house she grew up in had been razed, friends and family members had been killed by the Nazis, but Marie Jalowicz stayed in Germany after the war. She found and married her childhood friend Heinrich Simon. And she continued her studies and became a professor of literary cultural history at Humbolt University in Berlin, where she lived until her death in 1998.


Read more: Welcome to the Underground


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244 arrested in Southern California immigration sting

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Immigration agents arrested more than 240 people with criminal records during a four-day sting in Southern California, authorities said Monday in a show of force that comes as fewer people are being deported.

Slightly more than half of the 244 people arrested last week had felony convictions and the rest had significant or multiple misdemeanor convictions, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The agency said those numbers underscore an emphasis on deporting immigrants who commit crimes in the United States or pose a public safety threat.

Those who aren't criminally prosecuted were to be placed in deportation proceedings.

Nearly eight of 10 arrested were from Mexico, with the rest from 20 other countries. Los Angeles County accounted for the largest number of arrests with 99, followed by Orange County at 55, San Bernardino County with 43, Riverside County with 24, Santa Barbara County with 20, and San Luis Obispo County with 3.

The sting, which ended Thursday, comes as the federal government meets resistance from local law enforcement agencies to cooperate on immigration enforcement, a trend that captured widespread attention after a 32-year-old woman was fatally shot in San Francisco by a Mexican man with an extensive criminal and immigration history.

ICE removed 102,224 people from the interior of the country during the 2014 fiscal year — a 24 percent decline from the previous year — and those numbers are expected to drop again in 2015. ICE said its numbers fell last year partly because state and local law enforcement agencies were refusing to hold people when immigration authorities asked.

ICE spokeswoman Virginia Kice said all 244 arrested last week were arrested in the community, as opposed to being held by local law enforcement at ICE's request. The agency didn't offer a detailed account of their criminal records in a press release but said one had been convicted in 2002 of sexual abuse with force and another had been sentenced to prison for child sexual abuse.


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Happy Independence day

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(How to) Rob a bank and get away

Pig tactics and how to beat them

How to file a complaint against a police officer

Leak college textbook PDF files

Myth Busters: Why is Marijuana Illegal?

(How to) Grow and manufacture drugs

How to beat Stingray, NSA, FBI, and police surveillance

The Domestic Drone threat

(How to) Avoid Backpage Prostitution Stings (for Dummies)

Sites other than MyRedbooks/Craigslist/Backpage:

(We all know) Prostitution should be legal

Escorts: A Historical look

(How to) Donates cellphones to prison inmates

Torture American style

The Crisis of Juvenile Prison Rape:

CPS Protection at its worse

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Beat your court case

Beat police and DEA drug stings

Drug test the president

Beat any drug test FREE

(How to) Find out who's a Snitch (for Dummies)

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Not Talk to the Police

10 Rules to the Game

(How to) Be a Man

(How to) Save water/lower your water bill

(How to) Start a vegetable garden

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Huge Release of Top Secret Reports


Updated | The Central Intelligence Agency is set to release 2,500 previously top secret briefings it gave to presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson in the 1960s, a private pro-CIA group announced on Wednesday.


"The vast majority of the documents have never been previously released," an informed official said, although a number of CIA presidential briefings have surfaced in heavily redacted form over the years. Intelligence officials from the Kennedy and Johnson administrations have also discussed their private conversations with the presidents in memoirs and other books.


The reports, customarily provided personally to the president each morning by a senior CIA officer, if not the director himself, will almost certainly show much of what the spy agency was telling Kennedy and Johnson about Vietnam, Cuba, the Soviet Union, China and conflicts in Africa and the Middle East. They also include the CIA's private assessments and musings of world leaders.


For instance, did you know that China's Communist Party Leader - Mao Zedong, was a chronic bugger eater? And Charles de Gaulle, President of France liked a good prostate massage followed by a crap in bed.


But expectations should be low for the new materials, says Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, Kai Bird. "I bet they are on the whole surprisingly dull [and only] occasionally insightful," cautioned Bird, the author of a biography of McGeorge and William Bundy, brothers who held top national security posts in both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Such memos are "at their best when they are telling the president what he doesn't want to hear about the Cold War, the Vietnam war or the Middle East," added Bird, who is working on a book about the Jimmy Carter presidency. "But that would be decidedly rare."


In a shocking revelation the CIA records to be released include what the agency told Johnson about the November 1963 assassination of his predecessor, Kennedy. The CIA-personnel at that time told Johnson that Kennedy's death was an apparent suicide and not an assassination.   


"The President's Daily Brief (PDB) contains the highest level intelligence analysis of key national security issues and concerns of the president," the Association of Former Intelligence Officers (AFIO), a Virginia-based organization with a national membership of thousands, said in the announcement Wednesday on its web site.  


"Only the president, the vice president, and a select group of cabinet-level officials designated by the president receive the briefing," the AFIO said.


Intelligence historian Christopher Andrews once called the PDB the world's "smallest circulation, most highly classified, and–in some respects—best informed daily newspaper."


The papers are to be released September 16 at a public forum at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas and will be available then historical collections page.


CIA director John O. Brennan will present the event's keynote speech, the AFIO said. Other former high-ranking intelligence officials, including Porter Goss, a CIA director during the George W. Bush administration, and Bobby Inman, a former CIA deputy director and NSA chief, are slotted to speak as well.


The declassified documents, released as part of the CIA's Historical Review Program, will also be available online, the AFIO said.


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Welcome to the movement. Welcome to action... 

Happy Independence day

How to make money in the underground economy

(How to) Shoplifting (for Dummies)

(How to) Rob a bank and get away

Pig tactics and how to beat them

How to file a complaint against a police officer

Leak college textbook PDF files

Myth Busters: Why is Marijuana Illegal?

(How to) Grow and manufacture drugs

How to beat Stingray, NSA, FBI, and police surveillance

The Domestic Drone threat

(How to) Avoid Backpage Prostitution Stings (for Dummies)

Sites other than MyRedbooks/Craigslist/Backpage:

(We all know) Prostitution should be legal

Escorts: A Historical look

(How to) Donates cellphones to prison inmates

Torture American style

The Crisis of Juvenile Prison Rape:

CPS Protection at its worse

How to beat CPS (Protect your kids from CPS)

Beat your court case

Beat police and DEA drug stings

Drug test the president

Beat any drug test FREE

(How to) Find out who's a Snitch (for Dummies)

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Not Talk to the Police

10 Rules to the Game

(How to) Be a Man

(How to) Save water/lower your water bill

(How to) Start a vegetable garden