Should we trust police officers? Are police officers allowed to lie to you? Yes the Supreme Court has ruled that police officers can lie to the American people. Police officers are trained at lying, twisting words and being manipulative. Police officers and other law enforcement agents are very skilled at getting information from people. So don’t try to “out smart” a police officer and don’t try being a “smooth talker” because you will lose! If you can keep your mouth shut, you just might come out ahead more than you expected.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Crackers don't need white sheets to keep niggers in line Part I

By Christopher R Rice

The incarceration rates disproportionately impact men of color: 1 in every 15 African American men and 1 in every 36 Hispanic men are incarcerated in comparison to 1 in every 106 white men. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one in three black men can expect to go to prison in their lifetime.

Police are 31 percent more likely to pull over a black driver than a white driver, according to federal statistics. Black drivers are also more likely to be pulled over for minor offenses like a broken tail light or failure to signal a turn. In some situations, they are not even given a reason at all for the stop.

Black male offenders receive 20 percent longer sentences than white offenders committing the same crimes.

The overcrowded prison system, which reached a high in 2009 with 1.6 million inmates, is still bursting at the seams with about one in 100 adults behind bars.

America, with 5 percent of the world’s population, has 25 percent of its prisoners. 


Mass incarceration is expensive (California spends almost twice as much on prisons as on universities) and solitary confinement costs, on average, three times as much per inmate as in normal prisons. And remember: Most persons now in solitary confinement will someday be back on America’s streets, some of them rendered psychotic by what are called correctional institutions.


(AP) — Long before the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Freddie Gray, more than half of African-American millennials indicated they, or someone they knew, had been victimized by violence or harassment from law enforcement, a new report says.

Researchers, who have surveyed millennials several times during the past decade, point out that the disparities existed well before the "Black Lives Matter" movement began.

In the 2009 Mobilization and Change Survey, 54.4 percent of black millennials answered yes to the question "Have you or anyone you know experienced harassment or violence at the hands of the police?" Almost one-third of whites, 1 in 4 Latinos and 28 percent of Asian-Americans surveyed said yes to the same question.

The study, released to The Associated Press on Wednesday, comes as the United States grapples with concerns over policing in minority communities following the deaths of Martin, 17, in Florida three years ago, Brown, 18, in Ferguson, Missouri, last year and Gray, 25, in Baltimore earlier this year. Their deaths, as well as those of other black men and women, have inspired nationwide protests under the "Black Lives Matter" and "Say Her Name" monikers.

Another survey done by the project in 2013, the Black Youth Project Quarterly Survey, showed that the percentage of blacks and Latinos who said they knew people who carried guns had declined, but more of them knew someone who was the victim of gun violence. Twenty-four percent of blacks and 22 percent of Latino millennials said they or someone they knew "carried a gun in the last month."

Almost half of white millennials — 46 percent — said they knew of someone who carried a gun.


However, 22 percent of black millennials and 14 percent of Latino millennials said they or someone they knew were the victim of gun violence in the last year, compared with 8 percent of white millennials.

It's not surprising that young blacks and whites feel differently on these issues, given the different experiences the groups are reporting, said Jon Rogowski, an assistant political science professor at Washington University in St. Louis. For example, white millennials don't report having to explain themselves to police, while millennials of color report that officers stopped them simply to question them about what they were up to, he said.

After arrest, black millennials also don't believe everyone gets fair treatment from the legal system in the United States. They're not alone in this feeling, with only 38 percent of all millennials agreeing with the statement that "the American legal system treats all groups fairly" in the 2014 Black Youth Project survey.

The 2009 survey was taken between October and November 2008, May and July 2009 and November and January 2010 and included 4,345 people 18 years old and older. The 2014 Black Youth Project Survey consisted of four surveys conducted between 2012 and 2014 and included 6,118 people.

The surveys were done by GfK Knowledge Network using GfK's probability-based KnowledgePanel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 2.5 percentage points.

 
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