10 Reasons to De Fund the DEA

By Christopher R Rice


1.) Drug cartels funded DEA sex parties (Why the war-on-drugs is unwinnable)
By ABCNews

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents participated in "sex parties" with prostitutes paid for by drug cartels for a period of several years, according to a report released by the Justice Department's watchdog group.

Seven of the 10 DEA agents involved, most who held "top secret" clearance, admitted to attending the parties and some were suspended as a result, the Justice Department's inspector general inquiry found. The report does not specify where the parties occurred, but many news outlets have said they took place in Colombia.

"Many of these agents were alleged to have engaged in this high-risk sexual behavior while at their government-leased quarters, raising the possibility that DEA equipment and information also may have been compromised as a result of the agents' conduct," said the 131-page report by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz. The report, a review of sexual misconduct allegations in the DOJ's four law enforcement agencies, found widespread mismanagement at the DEA, the FBI, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The investigation came in response to 2012 allegations the Secret Service and DEA agents used prostitutes in Cartagena, Colombia. Overall, the report linked the law enforcement agencies to 26 allegations during a four-year period that ended in 2012. Of that, the DEA was involved in 19. Among the other findings: -- DEA agents were provided "money, expensive gifts and weapons from drug cartel members."

Local police "also alleged providing protection for the DEA agents' weapons and property during the parties," the report said. -- An ATF Director of Industry Operations who holds top security clearance modified a hotel room door "to facilitate sexual play" with anonymous people while on assignment.

"In addition, the DIO removed smoke detectors from the hotel room and inadvertently caused damage to the hotel's centralized fire detection system," the report said. He later pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor "fire prevention interference" charge. He was suspended for 14 days, but still works for the ATF with "top secret" security clearance.

-- A U.S. Deputy Marshal on assignment in Thailand could not be reached by phone. Every time State Department officials tried to contact him, "two women with heavy foreign accents answered the phone and stated (he) could not be disturbed." The State Department official later confirmed one of the women was a prostitute.

Read more: http://abcnews.go.com/us/dea-sex-parties-funded-drug-cartels-ig-report/story?id=29925411

2.) Prescription Drugs Now Kill More People In The US Than Heroin And Cocaine Combined

http://www.businessinsider.com/painkillers-kill-more-americans-than-heroin-and-cocaine-2012-9
  
3.) U.S. Government Finally Admits Marijuana Really Does Kill Cancer Cells

The idea that cannabis kills cancer cells seems to no longer be a conspiracy theory in the United States. With this information, can any state legitimately say no to medicinal marijuana?

Or could it even be considered a preventative herb to avoid getting cancer?

Amy Willis with Metro says that the US government has added a page on the use of cannabis and cannabinoids to their official cancer advice website.

Willis advises, “The National Cancer Institute, part of the US Department of Health, now advises that ‘cannabinoids may be useful in treating the side effects of cancer and cancer treatment’ by smoking, eating it in baked products, drinking herbal teas or even spraying it under the tongue.”

The official government site has a long list of medicinal uses of cannabis, including:

Anti-inflammatory activity, pain relief, anti-anxiety, stress relief, anti-tumor, antiviral activity and relieving muscle spasms caused by multiple sclerosis, and many many more.

The site goes on to talk about how cannabis has been proven to destroy cancer cells in lab experiments.

Read more: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/cannabis-pdq

Study: Cannabis Compounds Can Kill Cancer Cells

https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/10/24/study-cannabis-compounds-can-kill-cancer-cells

Marijuana Kills Cancer Cells, Admits the U.S. National Cancer Institute

http://naturalsociety.com/marijuana-kills-cancer-cells-admits-the-u-s-national-cancer-institute/

4.) Drugs Are Better and Cheaper Than Ever

By Rebecca McCray, Jason Koebler

Heroin, cocaine, and marijuana are just as available, far cheaper, and more potent than they were at the start of the War on Drugs, according to a new study.

We've known for far too long that the War on Drugs has been a failure, but the statistics reported in the British Medical Journal by Evan Wood, of the University of British Columbia's Urban Health Research Initiative, are astounding. Wood and his team aggregated government drug surveillance data from seven different countries. Between 1990 and 2010, the street price, adjusting for inflation, of heroin, cocaine, and marijuana fell roughly 80 percent. At the same time, the street drugs became much more potent: The average purity of heroin increased by 60 percent, the purity of cocaine increased by 11 percent, and the potency of cannabis increased 161 percent. The story is much the same in Europe and Australia, with street prices dropping and supply remaining stable, despite a huge increase in drug seizures.

Though we've known that weed is stronger than ever, it seems like the trend has extended to other, harder drugs.

New data shows drug policy isn’t doing what it’s meant to. The war on drugs drastically altered the face of the federal prison system, but it hasn’t made anyone safer or meaningfully decreased the availability of drugs. That’s just one of the findings of a new report from the Pew Research Center, which examines the drastic rise in the number of people being sent to prison for drug offenses in the 1980s and 1990s.

Read more: http://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-europe-drugs/illegal-drugs-may-be-cheaper-than-ever-idUKL2231195220061123

WHAT GOOD ARE DRUG BUST?

The Coast Guard had a record cocaine bust of...

13 tons https://www.cbsnews.com/news/coast-guard-in-record-drug-bust/

14 tons http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/17/us/coast-guard-cocaine-bust/index.html

16 tons http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/03/31/drug-seizure-bonanza-newest-coast-guard-cutter-has-banner-week-busts.html

18 tons http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/16/us/san-diego-coast-guard-cocaine-haul/index.html

And yet the price of cocaine has not gone up, it's gone down! The same is true for meth and other street drugs!

5.) Prohibition KILLS

America is the largest drug market in the world. We're 5 percent of the world's population — we consume 25 percent of the world's illegal drugs. Mexico has the misfortune to share a 2,000 mile border with the largest drug market in the world. At the end of the day, they'll run out of products. It's the illegality that makes those territories so valuable. If you criminalize anything only criminals can sell it. If only criminals can sell it, there's no recourse to law, there's only recourse to violence. That's created the cartels. It's our simultaneous appetite for — and prohibition of — drugs that makes those border territories worth killing for.

On the effect legalizing marijuana (just in Washington and Colorado) has had on Mexican trafficking

Just two states that have legalized marijuana, do you know what's happened in Mexico? Forty percent of Mexican marijuana imports, they've been cut by 40 percent. In Durango and Sinaloa, where most of the marijuana is grown, they've almost stopped growing it now, because they can't compete with the American quality and the American market. I'm not making this up; you get this from Customs and from DEA, from the people who are trying to intercept it on the border and judge how much is coming through as a percentage of how much they seize, and what they're telling us is it's down 37 percent over the last two years. So by stopping fighting, just two states stopping fighting the war on that drug, it has been effective.

Recognize drug laws as the price-support program that they are. If this stuff was trading at its actual cost, without the illegality premium, there wouldn't be enough money in drugs to support the cartels. But don't take my word for it, just ask Al Capone. Notice gangsters don't sell liquor any more. And there are no more drive-bys by bootleggers.

The US drug policy has caused the deaths and incarceration of hundreds of thousands, as prohibition did in the 30's with booze. It has allowed these cartels to become powerful and deadly. Now the US has created this monster and it's loose. And as long as drugs remain illegal the dead bodies will continue to pile up.

6.) Address the real issues For too long policy makers have used prohibition as a smoke screen to avoid addressing the social and economic factors that lead people to use drugs. Most illegal and legal drug use is recreational. Poverty and despair are at the root of most problematic drug use and it is only by addressing these underlying causes that we can hope to significantly decrease the number of problematic users.

Read more: www.transform-drugs.org.uk

7.) Second federal report critical of DEA actions with pharmacies

By Matt Grant

A recent report is blaming the DEA for many people being denied their legitimate prescriptions at Florida pharmacies. The Florida Board of Pharmacy is preparing to address the problem.

It's the second time this year that a Government Accountability Office report has been critical of the way the DEA works with pharmacies and wholesalers.

WESH 2 News has been investigating the issue for months.

"In the richest country in the world, that we have to ration medication to patients who really need it, is bizarre to me," said Bill Napier, a Jacksonville pharmacist.

The new report cites critical lack of access to pain medication, by pharmacists and patients, as a result of poor communication and unclear DEA rules.

The report said, "In the absence of clear guidance from the DEA some pharmacies may be inappropriately delaying or denying filling prescriptions for patients with legitimate medical needs."

Read more: http://www.gao.gov/assets/520/511464.pdf

8.) War on drugs a trillion-dollar failure

Richard Branson, Special to CNN December 7, 2012

(CNN) In 1925, H. L. Mencken wrote an impassioned plea: "Prohibition has not only failed in its promises but actually created additional serious and disturbing social problems throughout society. There is not less drunkenness in the Republic but more. There is not less crime, but more. ... The cost of government is not smaller, but vastly greater. Respect for law has not increased, but diminished."

Here we are, four decades after Richard Nixon declared the war on drugs in 1971 and $1 trillion spent since then. What do we have to show for it?

The U.S. has the largest prison population in the world, with about 2.3 million behind bars. More than half a million of those people are incarcerated for a drug law violation. What a waste of young lives.

The facts are overwhelming. If the global drug trade were a country, it would have one of the top 20 economies in the world. In 2005, the United Nations estimated the global illegal drug trade is worth more than $320 billion. It also estimates there are 230 million illegal drug users in the world, yet 90% of them are not classified as problematic.

In the United States, if illegal drugs were taxed at rates comparable to those on alcohol and tobacco, they would yield $46.7 billion in tax revenue. A Cato study says legalizing drugs would save the U.S. about $41 billion a year in enforcing the drug laws.

Have U.S. drug laws reduced drug use? No. The U.S. is the No. 1 nation in the world in illegal drug use. As with Prohibition, banning alcohol didn't stop people drinking -- it just stopped people obeying the law.

About 40,000 people were in U.S. jails and prisons for drug crimes in 1980, compared with more than 500,000 today. Excessively long prison sentences and locking up people for small drug offenses contribute greatly to this ballooning of the prison population. It also represents racial discrimination and targeting disguised as drug policy. People of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than white people -- yet from 1980 to 2007, blacks were arrested for drug law violations at rates 2.8 to 5.5 times higher than white arrest rates.

How would our society, our communities and daily lives improve if we took the money we use running a police and prison state and put it into education and health? Treating drugs as a health issue could save billions, improve public health and help us better control violence and crime in our communities. Hundreds of thousands of people have died from overdoses and drug-related diseases, including HIV and hepatitis C, because they didn't have access to cost-effective, life-saving solutions.

A Pew study says it costs the U.S. an average of $30,000 a year to incarcerate an inmate, but the nation spends only an average $11,665 per public school student. The future of our nations and our children should be our priority. We should be helping people addicted to drugs break their habits rather than putting users in prison.

When it comes to drugs, we should focus on the goals we agree on: protecting our kids, protecting public safety and preventing and treating drug abuse and addiction. To help unlock barriers to drug reform, last June, I joined the Global Commission on Drug Policy, which is bringing global leadership to drug reform to make fact-based research public and draw attention to successful alternative approaches.

Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/06/opinion/branson-end-war-on-drugs/index.html

9.) DEA driving OxyContin abusers to heroin

The result of the War on Drugs in the 1980s and 1990s was to fill one-quarter of America’s prison cells with drug offenders. The availability of street drugs remained unchanged, and the price of heroin and cocaine dropped by more than half. Drug dealers also began to sell purer versions of heroin, cocaine, and marijuana. Recently, the DEA has shifted its focus to physicians who prescribe opioids such as OxyContin, some of which is undoubtedly diverted or abused, although sensation-seeking journalists fueled the perceptions of a “crisis.” The shift prompted a letter from the attorneys general of 30 states, who complained that patients were not getting needed pain relief because doctors were afraid to prescribe. “If enough doctors are jailed or scared into not writing prescriptions, it’s conceivable that this drug war could have more impact than the ones against heroin and cocaine—doctors, after all, are harder to replace than crack dealers,” writes John Tierney. “But even if there’s less OxyContin on the street, is that worth the suffering of patients who can’t get the prescriptions they need?” And what has been the impact on drug abuse? A field survey on drug use in Cincinnati by the White House drug-policy agency found that “because diverted OxyContin is more expensive and difficult to purchase, users have switched to heroin” (John Tierney, “Handcuffs and Stethoscopes,” NY Times 7/23/05).

10.) Opium: The Other Failed US War in Afghanistan
By Jason Ditz April 30, 2014

There are plenty of failures to focus on in Afghanistan, but while they usually center around the calamitous US military occupation, another US war in the country, the “war on drugs” continues apace, with similarly feckless results.

12 years into this war, and with $7.5 billion spent, the latest figures (PDF) from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) show remarkable consistency, as the US continues to throw money and manpower at poppy eradication and appears to have no real impact on cultivation or export.

2013 saw a record 2,090 square km of Afghanistan used for poppy cultivation, and the grand US eradication program managed to destroy roughly 70 of them, so roughly 3.5% of the overall total.

That’s not even slowing them down, as poppy production in 2012 was 1,540 square km, so the US eradication isn’t even putting a meaningful dent in the rate of growth of the cultivation, one of the few viable crops for many Afghan farmers.

THE REAL PROBLEM is not American citizens, the real problem is in Washington, DC. If you agree PLEASE SHARE.

Stay Informed:

It's the Opium Stupid, Afghan surge guarantees CIA Drug Profits
https://undergroundnewzinc.blogspot.com/2017/09/its-opium-stupid-afghan-surge.html

Washington's Hidden Agenda: Restore the Drug Trade, the Spoils of War
https://undergroundnewzinc.blogspot.com/2017/11/washingtons-hidden-agenda-restore-drug.html

100 Years of a War on Drugs

https://undergroundnewzinc.blogspot.com/2017/10/100-years-of-war-on-drugs.html


Afghanistan: CIA's Shady history of drug trafficking

https://undergroundnewzinc.blogspot.com/2017/04/afghanistan-cias-shady-history-of-drug.html


(How to) Beat any drug test for FREE
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/drug-test--how-to-beat-any-drug-test.html 


Street Drug Price Guide

How to make Crystal Meth at home for Dummies

25 Methods of Dis-Information
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/fuck-the-us-military.html


Afghan Heroin & the CIA
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/afghan-heroin---the-cia-.html

Federal Agents Allowed Tons Of Cocaine To Be Smuggled Into The U.S.

http://www.businessinsider.com/federal-agents-allowed-cocaine-into-the-us-2011-8

CNN: CIA admits it overlooked Contras' links to drugs
http://www.cnn.com/US/9811/03/cia.drugs/

Why the CIA created ISIS
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/why-the-cia-created-isis.html

Fast and Furious Scandal: New Details Emerge on How the U.S. Government Armed Mexican Drug Cartels
http://abcnews.go.com/ABC_Univision/News/fast-furious-scandal-details-emerge-us-government-armed/story?id=17352694

CIA's Black budget
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/cia-black-budget.html
 

How to/What is Darkweb
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/-how-to--darkweb.html 

How to Beat any Police investigation
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/how-to-beat-police-investigations-.html 

How to file a compliant against a police officer
http://www.copsrcorrupt.com/police-brutality.html 

Popular posts from this blog

Medical Marijuana Could Cost Big Pharma

Operation Bayonet: Inside the Sting That Hijacked an Entire Dark Web Drug Market

2Pac - Can't C Me (HD Video)